How Can PRP Help Treat Hair Loss?

prp for hair loss
Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a procedure that has traditionally been used to treat people who suffer from various musculoskeletal conditions to help aid the body’s natural healing process. Recently, it’s shown promising results in dermatology as a powerful tool for treating several conditions, including hair loss.
PRP therapy is a process that involves several injections of platelet-rich plasma, a highly concentrated form of plasma matter derived from our own blood. Platelets are the only component of a blood cell that promotes cell growth and regeneration of growth tissue. In the hair loss aspect, PRP helps with the regenerations of hair follicle growth.
If you are interested in learning more about the PRP procedures, check out our blog on our website. We have an article dedicated to this procedure for hair loss.

According to Google, the search trends for ‘hair loss’ have gradually increased over the past few years, with almost a million people looking for symptoms, causes, and cures in the United States in 2020 alone. Any potential underlying health conditions aside, hair loss is a very natural occurrence that typically affects men more than women and is a disorder that is entirely preventable in most cases.

hair loss trend

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a procedure that has traditionally been used to treat people who suffer from various musculoskeletal conditions to help aid the body’s natural healing process. Recently, it’s shown promising results in dermatology as a powerful tool for treating several conditions, including hair loss.

Currently, it’s the only non-invasive method that shows significant promise for hair restoration procedures, with a very straightforward approach that is relatively painless and has zero recovery time.

What is PRP Therapy?

PRP therapy is a process that involves several injections of platelet-rich plasma, a highly concentrated form of plasma matter derived from our own blood. Platelets are the only component of a blood cell that promotes cell growth and regeneration of growth tissue. In PRP therapy, the plasma is five times more concentrated than the one in our blood cells, hence giving it the name platelet-rich.

The process of hair loss, depending on the type and severity, is either a temporary or permanent stop to the process of hair growth. In medical terms, this is known as alopecia and is the most common type of hair loss. However, the hair follicles don’t actually die, but rather put a pause on the hair’s next growth cycle.

This is where PRP treatment has shown promising results. The procedure involves injecting a person’s own blood into different areas on the scalp to stimulate the dermal papilla cells, which form, grow and cycle hair cells.

Procedure and Number of Treatments

For those who are squeamish and impatient, PRP therapy is a stroke of luck. Not only is it just a straightforward, three-step process, but in the majority of cases, it’s also completely painless.

Step one involves a simple blood draw, which is done in the same manner as giving a blood sample, which usually means drawing it from the arm.

Step two is where the blood gets separated, and where the plasma is isolated from the red blood cells and platelet-poor plasma. This is all done within 10 minutes, so it’s a pretty quick process.

Step three involves an injection into the scalp that takes a few minutes. This can be done with local anesthesia or topical numbing cream. As a result, most people experience only slight discomfort or very mild pain during the needle insertion.

For the treatment to be the most effective, three to four sessions are needed, each one being administered every six to eight weeks. Since the procedure is minimal and non-invasive, there are no post-procedural requirements.

PRP treatment for hair loss

PRP Eligibility

The majority of PRP hair loss treatments target alopecia which is the most common type of hair loss and affects both men and women. Subsequently, there is not a lot of research on its effectiveness when it comes to stress-related hair loss or hair loss caused by fungal infections, inflammation, or varying skin conditions.

Since PRP is a relatively new procedure, it’s important to examine your options before starting. Nevertheless, there is increasing research and evidence in the area of PRP hair loss treatments to support its effectiveness in the long term.

Potential Side Effects

Since PRP requires the use of a person’s own blood, there are some side effects to take into consideration before taking the procedure. However, most of them are mild, non-lethal, and go away without the need for medication.

Some of the most common side effects include experiencing some temporary pain on the injection site, potential skin tenderness, or mild swelling on the scalp. Moreover, itching can typically occur due to the body’s wound-healing process at the injection site. A few patients may experience headaches and very few may experience more serious side effects such as temporary bleeding from the scalp or an infection.

Aside from the few minor side effects, anyone who wants to feel some wind in their hair again can confidently breeze through the procedure.

To Wrap Up

Aside from the few minor side effects, anyone who wants to feel some wind in their hair again can confidently breeze through the procedure. To make sure PRP treatment for hair loss is right for you, visit Line Eraser MD and consult with Dr. Carol Eisenstat to seek out the safest, most effective, and natural method for the treatment.

Dr. Carol Eisenstat

Dr. Carol Eisenstat

is a highly trained and skilled board-certified anesthesiologist with a passion for facial aesthetics. She completed an accelerated 7-year combined Bachelor of Science – Medical Doctor program from CUNY – Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education and SUNY-Stony Brook University. Her education was achieved with high honors and she graduated with Magna Cum Laude distinction.

Sharing is caring:

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on telegram
Share on whatsapp
Share on email

I believe you'll be interested in reading these as well: